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Will deny citizenship to immigrants who use public benefits: US

File photo. Photograph:( AFP )

AFP Washington Aug 12, 2019, 08.41 PM (IST)

The administration of US President Donald Trump announced Monday new rules that aim to deny permanent residency and citizenship benefits to migrants who receive food stamps, Medicaid and other public welfare.

Announcing a new definition of the longstanding "public charge" law, the White House said migrants will be blocked from entering the country if they are likely to need public assistance, and those already here will not be able to obtain green cards or US citizenship.

"Through the public charge rule, President Trump's administration is reinforcing the ideals of self-sufficiency and personal responsibility, ensuring that immigrants are able to support themselves and become successful here in America," said Ken Cuccinelli, acting Director of US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

The Trump administration had hailed a large drop in migrant border crossings Thursday but found itself under attack over a massive sweep of  long-resident undocumented  immigrants working in several Mississippi slaughterhouses.

Detentions on the southern US border plunged for the second straight month in July after a deal with Mexico to block Central American migrants, the Department of Homeland Security announced Thursday.

US Border Patrol agents detained or blocked 82,049 migrants at the frontier with Mexico last month, down from 104,367 in June and a 13-year peak of 144,266 in May.

DHS credited a deal with Mexico in June to stem the flow of migrants traveling northward to the United States from Central America --  mainly Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador --  as well as cooperation by the three in cracking down on migrant smuggling groups.

The Department of Homeland Security attributed the fall to a deal signed with Mexico in June to stem the flow of migrants traveling northward to the United States from Central America, mainly Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

They also credited cooperation by the three, known as the Northern Triangle countries, in cracking down on migrant smuggling groups.

Story highlights

Detentions on the southern US border plunged for the second straight month in July after a deal with Mexico to block Central American migrants.