US election 2020: Surge in 'can I change my vote'; Donald Trump says trend refers to him

WION Web Team Washington, United States Oct 28, 2020, 08.13 AM(IST) Oct 28, 2020, 08.32 AM(IST)

US elections Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

More than 60 million Americans have cast ballots in the US presidential election, a record-breaking pace that could lead to the highest voter turnout in over a century

With less than a week to go for the final showdown between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger Joe Biden for the US election 2020, it appears that voters who have voted early are trying to change their minds.

More than 60 million Americans have cast ballots in the US presidential election, a record-breaking pace that could lead to the highest voter turnout in over a century, according to data from the US Elections Project.

Also read: US election 2020: How are votes counted in the presidential election?

Apparently, there was a spike in 'can I change my vote', and Trump believes that this means that the trend refers to him.

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Reportedly, the trend skyrocketed after the final presidential debate and has been going up steadily ever since.

A media professor at the University of New Mexico, Nick Flor posted his analysis about it.

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However, he later said that this happens in every US election and is not something that has occurred for the first time.

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Consumer confidence dropped sharply in October in three US states considered crucial for Republican President Donald Trump's re-election as fears about the economy's outlook mounted, according to a survey on Tuesday.

Also read: US election 2020: With a week to go, here's what is abuzz

The Conference Board's findings came ahead of next Tuesday's fiercely contested battle for the White House between Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden. Trump is trailing the former vice president in national opinion polls.

Consumer confidence in Florida dropped to a reading of 100.3 this month from 114.4 in September. Though confidence has rebounded after slumping as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the state, it is near levels seen just before the 2016 election.

In Pennsylvania, consumer confidence tumbled to a reading of 92.0 from 115.5 in September. Consumer confidence in Michigan fell to 119.2 in October from a reading of 124.1 in the prior month. Confidence in the three swing states was dragged by declines in consumers' expectations.

"The numbers can be choppy, but this does not bode well for Donald Trump's chances of re-election and with incomes being squeezed and COVID-19 cases on the rise, neither for the economy," said James Knightley, chief international economist at ING in New York.

Consumer confidence also fell in Ohio and Illinois and Texas this month but edged up in New York and California.

As result, overall consumer confidence dipped to a reading of 100.9 in October from 101.3 in September.

"There is little to suggest that consumers foresee the economy gaining momentum in the final months of 2020, especially with COVID-19 cases on the rise and unemployment still high," said Lynn Franco, senior director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board.

 

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