Belarus: Opposition leader urges foreign countries to mediate, while Lukashenko calls the protests 'foreign influence'

WION Web Team
New Delhi, India Published: Sep 09, 2020, 09:58 PM(IST)

This combination of pictures created on August 17, 2020 shows presidential candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya (L) during a press conference the day after Belarus' presidential election in Minsk on August 10, 2020 and Belarus' President Alexander Lukashenko Photograph:( AFP )

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Belarus’s opposition leader Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya on Wednesday said that foreign countries need to play a mediation role if Belarus is not able to resolve its own internal conflict

Belarus’s opposition leader Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya on Wednesday said that foreign countries need to play a mediation role if Belarus is not able to resolve its own internal conflict. She is currently in exile.

"In a situation where we were not able to resolve this problem alone, maybe in the future we would ask other countries to act as mediators in future negotiations," Tsikhanouskaya said in the town of Karpacz.

Also read: Another Belarus opposition politician, Maxim Znak, is seized by masked men

"I think it is impossible to fight violence and give violence," she had earlier said in a speech at Warsaw University.

Earlier, both the opposition within the country, along with the European Union referred to the ongoing crisis as an “internal matter”, which Belarusians should be able to deal with themselves.

Lukashenko says 'foreign influence' causing protests

Meanwhile, “Europe’s last dictator” and President of Belarus Alexander Lukashenko on Wednesday said that "foreign influence" is causing the protests across the country. Roughly translated by Reuters, his words implied "There is no any unrest in the country. And you know, without the external force - there would have not been even that."

"What do I mean - the external force? The one that is controlled from the outside. In this case, we and Russians know who operates and from where. Americans operate from a hub near Warsaw", he said.

He further went on to ask for Slavic states to show solidarity in the face of "foreign influence". "Russia, and Belarus - Ukraine - are Slavic states who needs a strong leader who has certain powers and authority. This is his strength. Maybe not such powers and authority Belarus president has. Maybe... The problem is not even the (Belarus) constitution. Many presidential powers are unthinkably huge. They need to be delegated to governors, to parliament", he said.

Also read: If Belarus falls, Russia will be next, says Lukashenko

He also acknowledged his 26 year long rule. Lukashenko has ruled Belarus since the break up of USSR. "Probably, I have been in power for too long. Well, turn on the iron - and here I am (telling) the election program, turn on the electric kettle - here is Lukashenko, turn on the TV - Lukashenko and so on. And, probably, some people are a little tired of it", he added.

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko on Tuesday suggested that Russia would be next if his regime falls in the face of a wave of mass demonstrations.

"You know what we concluded with the Russian establishment and leadership? If Belarus falls, Russia will be next," state news agency RIA Novosti quoted Lukashenko as saying in an interview with several Russian media.

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