Fernando Verdasco wants to sue Roland Garros after being forced to quit French Open 2020

WION Web Team New Delhi, India Sep 30, 2020, 05.30 PM(IST)

'Nobody can believe...': Fernando Verdasco wants to sue Roland Garros after being forced to quit French Open 2020 Photograph:( AFP )

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The ongoing French Open 2020 may find itself in controversy with Spanish tennis player Fernando Verdasco set to sue Roland Garros for forcing him out of the Grand Slam tournament. The Roland Garros 2020 is well underway into the second round with the likes of Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Dominic Thiem among the top contenders to win the French Open. 

The ongoing French Open 2020 may find itself in controversy with Spanish tennis player Fernando Verdasco set to sue Roland Garros for forcing him out of the Grand Slam tournament. The Roland Garros 2020 is well underway into the second round with the likes of Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Dominic Thiem among the top contenders to win the French Open. 

However, there were many tennis stars who opted out of the tournament with former world number seven Fernando Verdasco being one of them. Verdasco had tested positive for COVID-19 ahead of the tournament but was reportedly denied a second test and was forced to pull out of the Grand Slam event. 

Verdasco has now said that he is willing to sue Roland Garros for not allowing him to play in the showpiece tournament while adding it is not about monetary damage but personal and professional insecurity it caused.

The Spaniard, who was not allowed to take a second COVID-19 tests, took two independent tests which returned negative both the times. 

ALSO READ: Serena Williams pulls out of Roland Garros due to Achilles injury

"Do I want to sue Roland Garros? Yes, obviously. Nobody can believe that a tournament like Roland Garros can do that. It can't be. It is not a thing about money, it is a thing of damage which this does you personally and professionally," he said, per PA Media (h/t Sky Sports).

"I don't know if I'm going to play again this year or not because you lose the desire for everything. They [French Open organisers] do things as they please, without any coherence and without any respect. The rights of the players count for nothing. Then the next day, following when I have been left out of the draw, they change the rules and now you can do a second test—that was the final straw."

Verdasco has been a common name in French Open after playing in the Grand Slam even for the past 17 years.