World's largest economies are not in line with the Paris Agreement on climate

WION Web Team
NEW DELHI Published: Sep 15, 2021, 04:50 PM(IST)

File photo: The Paris Agreement, often referred to as the Paris Accords or the Paris Climate Accords, is an international treaty on climate change, adopted in 2015. It covers climate change mitigation, adaptation, and finance. Photograph:( Others )

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The G20 is made up of the majority of the world's greatest economies, both developed and developing. The group accounts for around 90% of global gross domestic product (GDP), 75-80% of international trade, two-thirds of the world's population, and roughly half of the planet's land area.

Despite scientists' warnings that dramatic cuts to greenhouse gas emissions are needed now, none of the world's biggest economies — including the whole G20 — have a climate strategy that matches their requirements under the 2015 Paris Agreement, according to an analysis published Wednesday. 

The watchdog Climate Action Tracker (CAT) examined the policies of 36 nations and the 27-nation European Union, concluding that all major economies were failing to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels.

Countries are responsible for 80% of global emissions.

The Gambia was the only country out of 37 that was "1.5 compliant," according to the study, which included some low-emission countries.

The G20 is made up of the majority of the world's greatest economies, both developed and developing.

The group accounts for around 90% of global gross domestic product (GDP), 75-80% of international trade, two-thirds of the world's population, and roughly half of the planet's land area.
 

Because the study only looked at a few smaller emitters, it's possible that additional emerging countries will follow suit. 

The research comes less than two months before the COP26 international climate meetings in Glasgow, which are mediated by the United Nations.

The event's chairman, British MP Alok Sharma, has expressed his desire to "keep 1.5 alive" as a global warming limit.

After scores of world leaders made bold new promises to cut greenhouse gas emissions during US President Joe Biden's meeting, CAT claimed that progress had stalled.

In April, the Climate Leaders Summit will be held. 

Meanwhile, a new Pew Research Center poll of 17 advanced economies throughout North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific indicates broad worry about the personal consequences of global climate change.

Most residents indicate they are willing to adjust at least some aspects of their lives and work to prevent the effects of global warming, but it is unclear whether their efforts will have an impact. 

Concern about climate change appears to be accompanied by a desire to mitigate its impacts through human actions.

To address the threat posed by global warming, majorities in each of the advanced economies surveyed indicate they are willing to make at least some changes in how they live and work. 

(With input from agencies)

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