Monkeys prefer audio twice as much as video, say experts

Edited By: Gandharv Walia
London   Updated: Jun 13, 2022, 10:20 AM(IST)

Monkeys prefer audio twice as much as video, say experts (representative image). Photograph:( Zee News Network )

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Later in the study, it was found that the levels of interaction with both stimuli dropped. The interactions with visual stimuli had also jumped in comparison with the audio stimuli. In audio files, they listened to music more than rain sounds and traffic noise. In video, they liked underwater scenes over the worm videos and abstract shapes and colours  

 

In new research, experts at the University of Glasgow and Aalto University in Finland have found that monkeys would like to prefer audio over video. The study was conducted on three white-faced saki monkeys at Korkeasaari zoo in Helsinki. In it, the researchers looked to find out the reaction of these animals to “primate-focused” content in the form of audio and video. In a tunnel in the monkey’s enclosure, the researchers formed three equally sized interactive zones with the help of infrared sensors. On a screen in front of the sakis, they were shown either a video or a sound. It was played for as long as they wanted to watch or listen to it. Their reactions were recorded. These animals seemed to like the audio stimuli twice as much as the visual stimuli.  

Later in the study, it was found that the levels of interaction with both stimuli dropped. The interactions with visual stimuli had also jumped in comparison with the audio stimuli.  

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In audio files, they listened to music more than rain sounds and traffic noise. In video, they liked underwater scenes over the worm videos and abstract shapes and colours.

Dr Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas of school of computing science of University of Glasgow, said, “Our findings raise a number of questions, which are worthy of further study to help us build effective interactive enrichment systems.”  

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“Further study could help us determine whether the short interactions were simply part of their typical behaviour, or reflective of their level of interest in the system. Similarly, their varying levels of interaction over time could be reflective of how engaging they found the content, or simply that they were becoming habituated to the tunnel’s presence in their enclosure.  

“While they chose audio more regularly than video, the results weren’t statistically significant enough for us to know for sure what they prefer,” Dr Ilyena added.  

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(With inputs from agencies)

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