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Birthright citizenship will be ended one way or the other, warns Trump

File photo of US President Donald Trump. Photograph:( Reuters )

WION Web Team Washington, DC, USA Oct 31, 2018, 08.36 PM (IST)

US President Donald Trump warned today that the "so-called birthright citizenship will be ended one way or the other".

As critics warned that an executive order wouldn't be enough to bring in the change, the US president said "it is not covered by the 14th Amendment because of the words “subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” "Many legal scholars agree," the president added.

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Under the Constitution's 14th Amendment, citizenship is granted to "all persons born or naturalised in the United States." It was passed by Congress in 1866 after the civil war.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders had said in an interview earlier that there was "more than just one piece of the puzzle" on immigration.  

"President Trump’s new claim he can unilaterally end the Constitution’s guarantee of citizenship shows Republicans’ spiralling desperation to distract from their assault on Medicare, Medicaid and people with pre-existing conditions," Democratic House leader Nancy Pelosi said.

"Harry Reid was right in 1993, before he and the Democrats went insane and started with the open borders (which brings massive Crime) “stuff.” Don’t forget the nasty term anchor babies. I will keep our country safe. This case will be settled by the United States Supreme Court!" the President said in his tweet.

"The World is using our laws to our detriment. They laugh at the stupidity they see!" he added.

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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) denounced Trump's statements as unconstitutional and a political manoeuvre ahead of November elections.

"This is a blatantly unconstitutional attempt to fan the flames of anti-immigrant hatred in the days ahead of the midterms," the ACLU said in a tweet.

Meanwhile, vice-president Pence waded into the debate, saying: "We all cherish the language of the 14th Amendment, but the Supreme Court of the United States has never ruled on whether or not the language of the 14th Amendment 'subject to the jurisdiction thereof' applies specifically to people who are in the country illegally."
 

Story highlights

Under the Constitution's 14th Amendment, citizenship is granted to "all persons born or naturalised in the United States." It was passed by Congress in 1866 after the civil war.