US election 2020: American companies offer off days to encourage employees to vote

From offering paid leaves to setting up websites to guide employees on how to vote — here's how various Americ-based companies are encouraging employees to cast their votes in the upcoming November US elections

Apple and Twitter

Tech giants Apple and Twitter have decided to offer paid time offs to their employees with the hope that the employees will use this paid off to go their nearest ballot boxes and cast their vote.

(Photograph:Reuters)

GAP

The clothing brand, GAP Old Navy, is encouraging employees to volunteer at their local ballot stations with their family and friends. 

(Photograph:Reuters)

Nike and Abbott Laboratories

Nearly 800 companies, including Nike, Qualcomm and Abbott Laboratories, have formed a CEO-led activist group called Time to Vote. This group is talking to companies and encouraging the top-level management to allow the employees to take few hours of paid-leave to cast their vote.

(Photograph:Reuters)

Tiffany, Walmart, Levis Strauss

Companies such as Tiffany, Walmart and Levis Strauss have offered flexible working hours to their employees for November 03. Packaged food company Conagra Brands has also said that the employees can talk to their managers and work out a flexible schedule that suits everyone.

(Photograph:Reuters)

Amazon

Around 150 companies, including Amazon and Etsy, have encouraged their employees to help sign up 350,000 new volunteers through Civic Alliance, a corporate-led campaign. 

(Photograph:Reuters)

Target and Kraft

Some companies, including Target and Kraft, have also taken the efforts to set up special tabs on their websites — or a whole website — to guide their employees on how to register for voting. This initiative started with partnership with League of Women Voters and the National Association of Manufacturers.

(Photograph:Reuters)

Starbucks

Starbucks is offering its employees few hours off to go and cast votes. Its Chief Executive Kevin Johnson said the company's policy has been partially due to Black voter suppression. 

In addition to this, Starbucks is also encouraging its employees to register for voting through its mobile app. "We know that barriers exist, notably in Black and Brown communities through the nation, that lend to systematic racism and require greater voter access and protections," he said. "No employee will have to choose between working their shift or voting on or before Election Day."

(Photograph:Reuters)

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