Solar Eclipse dazzles the world

A solar eclipse will be visible over the Earth's northern hemisphere on Thursday with parts of Canada and Siberia privy to the best view of the celestial event.

 

 

Partial eclipse

The eclipse will be partial, which means the people in its shadow won't be plunged into daytime darkness.

Instead, people with the maximum visibility, and necessary protective eyewear, will have a few minutes to glimpse the Moon's silhouette ringed by the Sun.

(Photograph:AFP)

Sun will be obscured

In northwest Canada, northern Russia, northwest Greenland and the North Pole, the Sun will be 88 per cent obscured by the Moon.

(Photograph:AFP)

Partial visibility

The eclipse will be partly visible to observers in northwest North America, parts of Europe including France and the UK, and some of northern Asia.

(Photograph:AFP)

If skies are clear

If skies are clear, Londoners will be able to see the Moon cover 20 per cent of the Sun at its maximum, at 11:13 am local time (10:13 GMT).

(Photograph:AFP)

Less obscure

"The farther southeast people are, the less the sun will be obscured," Florent Delefie of the Paris Observatory told AFP.

(Photograph:AFP)

Don't look at it directly

People must never look directly at the Sun, even with sunglasses or from behind a cloud warning "retinal burns can be irreversible".

(Photograph:AFP)

Crescent in the sky

Eyewitness footage in Avon-by-the-Sea, New Jersey captured a partial solar eclipse, creating a spectacular crescent which floated over the sea and painted the sky red.

(Photograph:AFP)

Reflected on Glass

Solar eclipses occur when the Moon moves across the face of the Sun and blocks out some or all of the light emanating from it.

(Photograph:AFP)

Why it happens

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, plunging the area where this happens into darkness. It happens only rarely in any given spot across the globe.

(Photograph:AFP)

Ring of Fire

Other countries experienced a 'ring of fire', or annular, a solar eclipse where the Moon moves entirely over the Sun but does not block out its light, leaving a thin ring of brilliance.

(Photograph:AFP)

Read in App