'Heard of human rights?': UK locals take to streets to chant 'kill the bill'

With chants of "Justice for Sarah" and "Kill the bill", UK locals raise their voice against the new bill that plans to give more power to the police to deal with nonviolent protestors

To the streets!

Thousands of people took to streets to raise voices against the new sweeping bill that would give the police more power to deal with all sorts of nonviolent demonstrations.

(Photograph:AFP)

Chants of protest

Demonstrators chanted "Kill the bill" in a peaceful gathering. People also came loaded with placards reading "Ever heard of human rights?", "I cannot breathe", "Why do I get 10 years when my rapist gets 5 years?", and more of such statements.

(Photograph:AFP)

Mask it up!

A protestor wears a face-covering with a 'resist police surveillance' during the protest. Women were also spotted wearing face mask reading 'women power'.

(Photograph:AFP)

Police officers attacked

The rally, however, turned violent after 10 pm when local police armed with helmets and shield started dispersing the crowd. The police officers claim to have been attacked with bricks, eggs, glass bottles and had lasers shone in their faces. Fireworks were also launched at Somerset and Avon police division.

(Photograph:AFP)

"Disgraceful"

After the revelations, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has called these attacks on police to be "disgraceful" through a Twitter statement.

"Last night saw disgraceful attacks against police officers in Bristol," he tweeted. "Our officers should not have to face having bricks, bottles and fireworks being thrown at them by a mob intent on violence and causing damage to property."

(Photograph:AFP)

For the fallen heroes

The demonstrators also rallied around a wall mural of George Floyd who was killed by police brutality. The police, crime, sentencing and courts bill would give police in England and Wales more power to impose conditions on peaceful protests, including those they deem to be too noisy or a nuisance to the community. Critics argue this infringes on the right to free and peaceful expression.

(Photograph:AFP)

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