A rare calm prevails over DC's biggest George Floyd protest in US

From taking a knee to painting the city, Americans took to the streets to carry out the biggest demonstration against the racism faced by the African-American community. While the country has been holding protests, which have turned violent and angry at times, Saturday saw peaceful and calmer protests.

A calmer tone

Saturday’s protests took on a relaxed tone compared with the more angry though mostly peaceful demonstrations of recent days.

(Photograph:Reuters)

End racism and brutality

Tens of thousands of demonstrators amassed in Washington and other U.S. cities on Saturday demanding an end to racism and brutality by law enforcement.

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Largest demonstration

Saturday marked the largest demonstration over Floyd’s killing to date.

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Equal fight

Protestors all over the US are now voicing against multiple cases where African-American community had to face violence and discrimination, without achieving justice.

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All for all

Not just George Floyd, people are naming as many past incidents of discrimination as they can find. The aim is to make everyone stand up for everyone who has suffered.

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Solidarity

The protests on Saturday saw people embracing each other, as they provided support to the African-American community that has been fighting against discrimination since decades.

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Creative expressions

The protests, that saw the biggest audience, painted walls, murials, windows etc to spread the message.

(Photograph:Reuters)

Silencing the racists

Protests used powerful symbols to spread their message, and silence the racists and murderers. They raised their fists in the air, and took a knee -- all for justice.

(Photograph:Reuters)

Justice over health

Crowds numbering in the tens of thousands converged on the nation’s capital, despite health risks still posed by the coronavirus, though official estimates of the turnout were unavailable.

(Photograph:Reuters)

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