When Indian Army gallantly won Haji Pir Pass but was returned to Pakistan during the Tashkent agreement

The brilliantly executed attack took the Pakistanis by surprise as the Indian troops attacked with speed and lethal force completely outthinking the Pakistanis.

Brilliantly executed attack

On August 28, 1965 Indian forces captured the Haji Pir Pass, a strategic location in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir under the leadership of Brigadier Bakshi and Major Dayal.

Their gallantry still inspires the Indian Army as they were able to beat back the Pakistani forces who had held sway. The brilliantly executed attack took the Pakistanis by surprise as the Indian troops attacked with speed and lethal force completely outthinking the Pakistanis.

(Photograph:AFP)

Brigadier Z A Bakshi led from the front

The attack was spearheaded by the Bihar regiment, 41 mountain brigade of the Dogra regiment, Rajput division and the 1 Para which was to capture Sank and Lediwali Gali.

The pincer movement by the Indian forces stumped the Pakistani forces as Brigade Commander, Brigadier Z A Bakshi led from the front.

The hilly terrain was captured in a series of silent, surprise attacks as the Pakistani troops fled from their well-entrenched positions.

(Photograph:AFP)

Uri-Poonch road

The attack carried out in the most adverse conditions with rain and hilly terrain made it a case study on capturing enemy positions in military history. Major Dayal had to climb a hill at night through the rain as he reached the Uri-Poonch road.

The Indian troops came under sustained enemy fire at one point but Major Dayal was able to repulse the enemy attack.
 

(Photograph:AFP)

India's superior leadership and better strategy

Major Ranjit Singh Dayal was awarded the Maha Vir Chakra for his gallantry during the battle. Although the Pakistani troops counterattacked but they were pushed back by Indian forces who had taken up vital, strategic positions all around the Haji Pir.

The Pakistani troops could never really set up a coordinated attack with Indian troops dominating due to superior leadership and better strategy.

(Photograph:AFP)

Indian Army demolishes Pakistan

The final operation, the assault on Haji Pir was called "Operation Bakshi".

Haji Pir located at an altitude of 9,000 feet was considered an ideal defensive position for the Pakistani forces, but Indian forces were able to penetrate it due to the leadership of General Brigadier Zorawar Chand Bakshi who not only outflanked the enemy but later reorganised the defence displaying tactical skill and planning which helped the Indian Army demolish the Pakistanis.

(Photograph:AFP)

Tashkent talks

However, the strategic Haji Pir Pass was returned to Pakistan during the Tashkent talks held in the former Soviet Union. India, therefore, gave away the strategically important Pass which dominated Kargil.

Prime Minister Shastri died on 10th January, 1966 after signing the Tashkent Declaration with President Ayub Khan of Pakistan.

(Photograph:AFP)

Tashkent Declaration

The Tashkent talks took place between India and Pakistan in the former Soviet Union now Uzbekistan between  4–10 January 1966 in order to arrive at a permanent ceasefire. 

The Tashkent Declaration wasn't taken too kindly by the Pakistani people as riots erupted in the country which greatly harmed General Ayub's image in the country.

(Photograph:AFP)

Observe the ceasefire terms

Under the agreement, it was decided the Prime Minister of India and the President of Pakistan agreed that all armed personnel of the two countries shall be withdrawn not later than 25 February, 1966 to the positions they held prior to 5 August, 1965, and both sides shall observe the ceasefire terms on the ceasefire line.

The Tashkent Declaration said the Prime Minister of India and the President of Pakistan have agreed that relations between India and Pakistan shall be based on the principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of each other.

(Photograph:AFP)

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