Tornadoes in US: Before and after satellite images show massive destruction

Dozens of tornadoes ripped through five US states, leaving more than 90 people dead and causing multiple fatalities. Here are before and after satellite images that show the scale of destruction

Massive destruction

US authorities and rescuers are racing against time in desperate search for the survivors on Sunday (December 12) after tornadoes killed at least 94, leaving several missing. 

At least 30 tornadoes ripped through at least six states (Kentucky, Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee) late Friday and early Saturday, causing massive destruction of life and property. People are mourning those who lost their lives. Prayers are offered for those who are still missing.  

(Photograph:AFP)

Death toll expected to rise

Authorities said that the death toll is expected to rise as rescue workers are facing difficulties to dig through the debris. 

During the search and rescue operations, officers were seen helping stunned citizens across the US heartland sift through the rubble of their homes and businesses overnight. 

"That number is going to exceed more than 100," Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear told CNN. 

(Photograph:AFP)

At least six died in an Amazon warehouse

This combination of pictures released by Maxar Technologies shows tornado destruction of downtown Mayfield, Kentucky and before the tornado on January 28, 2017.

Meanwhile, at least six died in an Amazon warehouse in Illinois where they were on the night shift processing orders ahead of Christmas. 

Amazon chief Jeff Bezos said he was heartbroken, as he tweeted, "The news from Edwardsville is tragic," Bezos tweeted about the town where the facility was located. We're heartbroken over the loss of our teammates there, and our thoughts and prayers are with their families and loved ones."

(Photograph:AFP)

Destruction in Kentucky

This combination of pictures released by Maxar Technologies shows the Mayfield Consumer Products Candle Factory destroyed by a tornado in Kentucky and before the tornado on January 28, 2017.

More than 80 people are believed to have been killed in Kentucky alone. Many of the workers at a candle factory in the city of Mayfield as Beshear said there were about 110 people were there when the storm hit reducing to a pile of rubble. 

(Photograph:AFP)

Situation in Arkansas

This combination of pictures released by Maxar Technologies shows the tornado destruction of the Monette Manor Nursing Home in Monette, Arkansas and before the tornado on February 22, 2021.

Two people died in Arkansas. 

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Sunday offered "sincere condolences". Putin told Biden in a telegram, according to the Kremlin, "Russia shares in the grief of those who lost loved ones as a result of this disaster. We hope the victims will recover and that the consequences of this disaster will be overcome quickly."

(Photograph:AFP)

Farm buildings destroyed

This combination of pictures released by Maxar Technologies shows farm buildings destroyed by a tornado in Monette, Arkansas and before the tornado on February 22, 2021. 

Victor Gensini, a professor in geographic and atmospheric sciences at Northern Illinois University said that unusually high temperatures and humidity created the environment for such an extreme weather event at this time of year. 

(Photograph:AFP)

Disaster in Kentucky

This combination of pictures released by Maxar Technologies shows buildings destroyed by a tornado in Mayfield, Kentucky and before the tornado on January 28, 2017. 

Video and photos posted on social media showed brick buildings in downtown Mayfield flattened, with parked cars nearly buried under debris. 

US President Joe Biden declared a disaster in Kentucky, which is the worst-affected state. Other states that are impacted are Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee. 

"It's a tragedy. And we still don't know how many lives are lost and the full extent of the damage," Biden said in televised comments.

(Photograph:AFP)

Eight dead at candle factory

The above aerial image shows the damage caused by the tornado.

President Joe Biden has deemed it as "one of the largest" storm outbreaks in history.

At least 8 people are confirmed dead at the candle factory in Kentucky that was severely hit by the tornado. Another eight people remain missing.

(Photograph:AFP)

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