Taliban faces 5 major challenges in Afghanistan

Taliban has to ensure “safe, secure, and orderly departure from Afghanistan of Afghans and all foreign nationals”.

Taliban government formation

The defeat of America was a "big lesson for other invaders and for our future generation", the Taliban said on Tuesday, hours after the last foreign troops departed Afghanistan. 

"It is also a lesson for the world," spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said from the runway of Kabul airport.

The Taliban is now set to form the government in Afghanistan which it said will take place in two weeks.

The group also has to ensure “safe, secure, and orderly departure from Afghanistan of Afghans and all foreign nationals” which means not just on August 31 which was the last date for the US pullout but also well into the future.

(Photograph:AFP)

Taliban has to address problems in Afghanistan economy

Afghanistan's economy has taken a major hit in the past few months and its currency has dipped. Also foreign aid has stopped after Taliban's blitz.

The IMF had earlier decided to withhold its assistance to Afghanistan amid uncertainty over the status of the leadership in Kabul. The Afghan economy was already affected due to COVID-19 pandemic.

Germany had announced the suspension of its development aid. Berlin was going to provide $503.1 million in aid this year, including $292.5 million for development.

The Taliban will have to fix the economy and ensure funds flow into the country in order ensure the economy remains dominant.

(Photograph:AFP)

International recognition for Taliban a major challenge

UNSC members had demanded that the Afghanistan not be used as a "shelter" for terrorism. However, permanent members China and Russia had abstained during the passing of the UNSC resolution. 

The UN Security Council had adopted the resolution on Monday requiring the Taliban to honour their commitment to let people freely leave Afghanistan, but the measure did not cite a "safe zone" mentioned by French President Emmanuel Macron. 

The resolution drafted by the United States, Britain and France was passed with 13 votes in favor and no objections. The resolution said the Council expects the Taliban to allow a "safe, secure, and orderly departure from Afghanistan of Afghans and all foreign nationals." 

It referred to an August 27 statement by the Taliban in which the group said Afghans would be able to travel abroad, and leave Afghanistan any time they wanted including by any border crossing, both air and ground. 

(Photograph:AFP)

ISIS-K challenge for Taliban

ISIS-K had emerged in 2015 from disgruntled members of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan, as well as from some of members of al Qaeda. 

The group has grown while playing the sectarian card proclaiming their quest for Salafist supremacy in Afghanistan.

Between 2015 and 2016, ISIS-K had acquired control of large territories in Afghanistan’s eastern Nangarhar and Kunar provinces weakening the Afghan Taliban's presence there. 

The terrorist group is estimated to have around 4,000-5,000 fighters after their ranks enlarged by the recent prison breaks that followed the collapse of the government. 

The Taliban has to tackle the ISIS-K as it consolidates its hold over Afghanistan.

(Photograph:AFP)

Panjshir Valley resistance

Since the fall of Kabul on August 15, the Panjshir has been the only province to hold out against the Taliban, although there has also been fighting in neighbouring Baghlan province between Taliban and local militia forces.

Fahim Dashti, a spokesman for the National Resistance Forces (NRF), a group loyal to local leader Ahmad Massoud said the fighting occurred on the western entrance to the valley where the Taliban attacked NRF positions.

He said the attack which may have been a probe to test the valley's defences was repulsed with eight Taliban killed and a similar number wounded, while two members of the NRF forces were wounded. 

Massoud, son of the former anti-Soviet Mujahideen commander Ahmad Shah Massoud has established himself in the Panjshir Valley with a force of several thousand made up of local militias and remnants of Army and Special Forces units.

There have been reports of clashes as anti-Taliban forces have consolidated at Panjshir Valley which could prove to be a major challenge for the Taliban.

(Photograph:AFP)

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