From pacer Jasprit Bumrah to spinner Rashid Khan, bowlers who can push batsmen on the backfoot in Cricket World Cup 2019

India's Jasprit Bumrah, Afghan's Rashid Khan, South Africa's Kagiso Rabada etc, are expected to pose a threat to batsmen in the World Cup 2019

Jasprit Bumrah (India)

India's Jasprit Bumrah is ranked number one in ODI's and is known to be a death-overs specialist. 

Bumrah will play a huge role in India's campaign for winning the World Cup third time. 

Rated as the best bowler in the world at present, he has been in top form in the IPL, picking up 19 wickets in 16 matches. 

(Photograph:AFP)

Rashid Khan (Afghanistan)

Rashid is the number three ranked bowler in ODIs,  he has been in amazing form in the last two years and has been one of the main reasons behind Afghanistan's rise in world cricket.

With his ability to contain the batsman and simultaneously pick wickets, he will be tough for the batsmen to hit out of the park in the World Cup.

He picked up 17 wickets in the 15 matches in the IPL 2019.

(Photograph:AFP)

Kagiso Rabada (South Africa)

Rabada's consistent pace and his ability to generate bounce and swing on any given track gives the South African team an opportunity to pick wickets at any given stage of the game.

He along with Dale Steyn and Chris Morris will be crucial for the Proteas to have a successful run at the World Cup. 

Rabada played a vital role in Delhi's IPL campaign picking up 25 wickets in the 12 matches.

(Photograph:AFP)

Yuzvendra Chahal (India)

The leg-spinner will be one of India's main weapons in the quest for a third World Cup title. 

Chahal has picked 71 wickets in 41 ODIs for India.

He remains the major force for Virat Kohli and the skipper would be hoping that the 28-year-old picks up wickets in the slog overs during the World Cup.

(Photograph:AFP)

Hasan Ali (Pakistan)

Hasan Ali has been a match-winner for Pakistan by delivering some dazzling performances, especially when Pakistan lifted the 2017 Champions Trophy. 

Ali was named the Man of the Tournament in the Champions Trophy as he picked up 13 wickets. 

With 77 ODI wickets in 44 games, the pacer will be expected to replicate his 2017 performance in England and help Pakistan win the World Cup title. 
 

(Photograph:AFP)

Imran Tahir (South Africa)

Imran Tahir at 40 years old is playing in his last World Cup and he would be eager to perform well and contribute to South Africa's attempt to win their maiden World Cup. 

He has played 98 ODIs for South Africa and has picked up 162 wickets, with best figures of 7/45.

He was the highest wicket-taker in the IPL 2019, picking up 26 wickets in 17 matches he played.

(Photograph:AFP)

Mitchell Starc (Australia)

Starc was named the Player of the Tournament after he picked 22 wickets in the previous edition of the World Cup.

Starc will have to play a big role in leading the Australian pace attack, trying to defend the World Cup title.

Although, he hasn't been in top form in the past couple of years as he's been suffering through a lot of injuries. 

(Photograph:AFP)

Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh)

Shakib will be leading the spin attack for Bangladesh in England. 

A veteran of 198 ODIs picking up 249 wickets, Shakib has immensely contributed to Bangladesh's success in all formats of the game.

Being the experienced campaigner that he is, Shakib will be crucial for Bangladesh to make an impact in the World Cup.

(Photograph:AFP)

Trent Boult (New Zealand)

Boult has been leading the pace attack for New Zealand for many years, swinging the ball day in day out on any pitch across the world. 

He, alongside Starc, was the leading wicket-taker in the 2015 World Cup and New Zealand's hopes this edition will be dependent on him to lift the Cup. 

(Photograph:AFP)

Nathan Lyon (Australia)

Lyon will be appearing in the World Cup for the first time.

The off-spinner has been a lethal weapon in Australia's bowling attack considering his ability to generate bounce and turn, even on slow and low tracks. 

Though he's just played 25 ODIs, his experience of performing in Tests could prove to be very handy for Australia.

(Photograph:AFP)