Prophet Muhammad's birthday ? a holiday known as Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi

Thousands of Kashmiri Muslims gathered at the shrine in Srinagar to offer prayers on the Prophet's birth anniversary. Pakistani Muslims celebrate the birth of the Prophet Mohammed on December 1, on the 12 Rabil ul Awal, a month on the Muslim calendar

'Holy Relic'

A Kashmiri cleric displays a holy relic believed to contain a hair from the beard of Prophet Muhammed during Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi, the birthday of the Prophet, at the Hazratbal Shrine in Srinagar on December 1, 2017.

The beard of Prophet Mohammed was said to have been trimmed from his face by his favourite barber Salman in the presence of first caliph Abu Bakr, the prophet's cousin and son in law Ali and several others. Individual hair were later taken away, but the beard itself is kept in a glass reliquarium.

(Photograph:AFP)

Rabi' al-awwal, the third month in the Islamic calendar

Kashmiris react as a priest displays a relic believed to be a hair from the beard of Prophet Muhammed during Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi at the Hazratbal Shrine in Srinagar on December 1.

Mawlid is the marked as the birthday of the Islamic prophet Muhammad which is observed as Rabi' al-awwal, the third month in the Islamic calendar.

(Photograph:AFP)

Mawlid is derived from the Arabic root word, which means to give birth, bear a child, descendant

View of an illuminated mosque during celebrations marking Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi on November 30.

Pakistani Muslims celebrate the birth of the Prophet Mohammed on December 1, on the 12 Rabil ul Awal, a month on the Muslim calendar.

(Photograph:AFP)

Rally during celebrations marking Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi

Pakistani Muslims hold torches at a rally during celebrations marking Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi on November 30.

The origin of Mawlid observance dates back to the early four Rashidun Caliphs of Islam. The Ottomans declared it as an official holiday in 1588.

(Photograph:AFP)

The issue of the correct date

Pakistani Muslim children ride a camel during the rally organised for celebrations marking Eid-e-Milad-un-Nabi on November 30.

The date of Muhammad's birth is a matter of dispute since the exact date is unknown and is not recorded in the Islamic traditions. The issue of the correct date of the Mawlid is recorded by an Islamic scholar, Ibn Khallikan as constituting the first proven disagreement concerning the celebration.

(Photograph:AFP)

12th Rabi' al-awwal

Pakistani Muslims stand outside an illuminated mosque during celebrations marking the Eid Milad-un-Nabi on November 29.

12th Rabi' al-awwal is the accepted date among most of the Sunni scholars, while Shia scholars believe 17th Rabi' al-awwal as the accepted date.

(Photograph:AFP)

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