Science exhibition fights humans’ 'unnatural' homophobia in Switzerland

WION Web Team
Zürich Published: Dec 11, 2021, 05:12 PM(IST)

A science exhibition shows gender diversity and homosexuality are not immoral or unnatural (representative image). Photograph:( Reuters )

Story highlights

A science exhibition seems to be breaking stereotypes in Switzerland. It seems to be spreading the word that gender diversity and homosexuality are not immoral or unnatural, as per a media report. The 'Queer — Diversity is in our nature' exhibition, which is being held till March 2023, at the Bern Museum in Switzerland's capital, is encouraging tolerance and openness

A science exhibition seems to be breaking stereotypes in Switzerland. It seems to be spreading the word that gender diversity and homosexuality are not immoral or unnatural, as per a media report.  

The 'Queer — Diversity is in our nature' exhibition, which is being held till March 2023, at the Bern Museum in Switzerland's capital, is encouraging tolerance and openness.  

This exhibition looks to show the diversity of gender and sexual orientation within humans and other animals, the report said on Friday.   

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The exhibition displays biological studies to confront contemporary debates on homosexuality to bridge nature with society. It also includes the finding that same-sex relationships have been witnessed in over 1,500 species.  

Christian Kropf, biologist, University of Bern's Institute of Ecology and Evolution and scientific curator of the exhibition, said that same-sex relationships are an everyday occurrence in nature. They also generate social cohesion.   

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"Many people think that homosexuality and being queer are marginal and perverse phenomena. They say they are unnatural. But this is nonsense!" Kropf said.  

European rams and male bottlenose dolphins are best examples of species, who are capable of forming lasting same-sex relationships, Kropf added.  

(With inputs from agencies) 

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