US teachers say #ArmMeWith resources, not guns

The hashtag #ArmMeWith has been trending for the last few days. Photograph:( ANI )

ANI Washington, DC, USA Feb 24, 2018, 04.39 AM (IST)

Teachers across the United States have come up with an innovative campaign to reject President Donald Trump's controversial proposal of arming teachers with concealed guns and weapons.

The hashtag #ArmMeWith has been trending for the last few days, in the wake of last week's shooting at a Florida high school, which claimed 17 lives.

"I AM A TEACHER. NOT A POLICE OFFICER, NOT A SOLIDER, NOT A BODYGUARD. I would risk my life to save my students but I would never keep a concealed gun in my classroom, nor use it EVER. #ArmMeWith TISSUE & PAPER TOWELS. that's all, Please & Thank you," a teacher wrote on Twitter.

"Bringing more guns into our schools does nothing to protect our students and educators from gun violence. Our students need more books, art and music programs, nurses and school counsellors; they do not need more guns in their classrooms. #ArmMeWith," a second teacher posted on the micro-blogging site.

A third one wrote, "It's about weapons of war. No civilian needs access. #BanAssaultWeapons #NeverAgain #ArmMeWith"

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"I'm trained to teach, not to shoot. Instead of arming teachers with more gun, supply us with materials & resources we desperately need. From 1:1 devices to #2 pencils. From mental health care to healthy nutrition. #ArmMeWith #DeafEd," posted another teacher on Twitter.

"#ArmMeWith fair pay, an abundance of resources, excellent insurance, mental health treatment for TEACHERS, compassion from the administration, less testing, more free will to teach my students to be GOOD HUMANS," tweeted a fifth teacher.

Scores of students from Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School joined other students from other high schools on Wednesday as protests against the ending of gun violence gained momentum across the US.

Students from California to Washington D.C. held marches in solidarity with the survivors from the Florida high school. The crowd marched at the state Capitol complex in Tallahassee, with banners and posters and chanting slogans such as "Never again!" and "Shame on you!"

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Trump said on Thursday that he pushed lawmakers to "look at the possibility of giving" guns to "adept teachers with military or special training experience."

Scores of students from Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School joined other students from other high schools on Wednesday as protests against the ending of gun violence gained momentum across the US.

Students from California to Washington D.C. held marches in solidarity with the survivors from the Florida high school. The crowd marched at the state Capitol complex in Tallahassee, with banners and posters and chanting slogans such as "Never again!" and "Shame on you!"

Trump said on Thursday that he pushed lawmakers to "look at the possibility of giving" guns to "adept teachers with military or special training experience."

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Trump on Tuesday recommended a ban on 'bump stocks' gun devices. He also directed his Attorney General, Jeff Sessions to make the proposed changes in the country's gun control law.

Last week, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, went on a rampage at the high school in Parkland, Florida and gunned down 17 students and injured 14 others. He allegedly used an AR-15 assault rifle that he had purchased legally.

Cruz was a former student and was expelled from the high school for disciplinary reasons. He has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder.

After the incident, many lawmakers, gun control advocates and student survivors of the Florida school shooting have urged the Trump administration to implement tougher gun measures.

In most US states, the age limit for purchasing the AR-15 rifle is 18 years, while the age limit for handguns is 21 years.