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Nearly 200 nations agree on historic climate pact to phase out super greenhouse gases

The Kigali deal is legally binding, has very specific timetables and has an agreement by rich countries to help poor countries adapt their technology. Photograph: (AFP)

WION Rwanda Oct 15, 2016, 08.20 AM (IST)

Leaders and Representatives from nearly 200 countries reached an agreement to cut back on greenhouse gases on Saturday, a Rwandan minister said. 

The agreement will divide countries into three group, with different deadlines to reduce the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) gases, which are emitted by refrigerators and air conditioners. 

US secretary of state John Kerry said, "It’s a monumental step forward." 

Under the deal, developed nations will start with a 10 per cent cut to the emission of gases by 2019 and by 2036, about 85 per cent. 

Developing nations will limit the use of the gases by 2024 or 2028 including India, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and the Gulf countries. 

These countries require more time as they still have a developing population and also India is afraid this will slow down its growing industries, Reuters reported. 

UN environment chief Erik Solheim said, "Last year in Paris, we promised to keep the world safe from the worst effects of climate change. Today, we are following through on that promise."

The Kigali agreement is legally binding and it enables rich countries to help the poor ones to adapt their technology. This deal comes a week after, the 2015 Paris Climate deal was ratified by India, the European Parliament, and Canada and will enter into force soon. 

Kigali deal is legally binding, has very specific timetables and has an agreement by rich countries to help poor countries adapt their technology.

The aim of the deal is to prevent the Ozone layer from depleting and was built on the 1987 Montreal Protocol to curb the use of CFC's. 

(WION with inputs from Reuters)

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