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Indonesia urges international community to respect its law

The execution is part of President Joko Widodo's pledge to combat against drugs in the country. Photograph: (Getty)

Reuters Jakarta, Indonesia Jul 29, 2016, 02.21 AM (IST)
Indonesia urged the international community to respect its law, as another round of executions of drug convicts loomed.

The response came after the United Nations human rights chief on Wednesday (July 27) called for an immediate reinstatement of a moratorium on the death penalty.

"The capital punishment is not against regime in international law. For Indonesia, death penalty is a 'positive' law that is still effective here, and its not against the human rights under the context of constitution 1945," Foreign Ministry spokesman Armanatha Nasir told a news briefing in Jakarta.

"The action that Indonesia takes now is just about law implementation and enforcement. Just like how Indonesia respects the law of other nations, we hope all countries will respect the Indonesian law," he added.

The United Nations and European Union had urged the executions be halted. 

"Such death sentences are unlawful and tantamount to an arbitrary execution as they are undertaken in contravention of Indonesia’s international human rights obligations," the UN said in a statement on Thursday.

Amnesty International called the executions "a deplorable act that violates international and Indonesian law" and pleaded that the other death sentences not be carried out.

"The injustice already done cannot be reversed, but there is still hope that it won't be compounded," the rights group's regional director, Rafendi Djamin, said.

Fourteen drug convicts, including nationals of Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Pakistan and India, will be executed in the next round, Attorney General Muhammad Prasetyo has said.

The execution is part of President Joko Widodo's pledge to combat against drugs in the country. Widodo has pledged to increase the number of executions this year and next.

Security has been tightened around the port leading to the prison island of Nusa Kambangan.

(Reuters)
 
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