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California governor says 'yes' to tampon tax, invites wrath of state lawmakers

"Today's lesson: my uterus should carry the burden of fiscal responsibility for the state," an assembly member tweeted. Photograph: (Getty)

California, United States Sep 15, 2016, 02.34 AM (IST)
California governor Jerry Brown's decision to veto the bill aimed at repealing state sales taxes on tampons has sparked criticism from state lawmakers who had pushed for the measure.

Cristina Garcia, who authored the bill, took to Twitter after Tuesday's decision saying: "Today's lesson: my uterus should carry the burden of fiscal responsibility for the state. Thank goodness GovBrown is around to #mansplain it." Similar reactions poured in on social media from other users. 
   
Lawmakers in at least 15 states in US, including New York and Illinois, have "heeded the call" to end sales tax on such feminine products. New York repealed its tampon tax in June, joining Maryland, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and New Jersey.

Brown, who vetoed several similar bills that would have ended certain state taxes for diapers and other item, had said those measures, together with repeal of the tax on feminine hygiene products, would collectively reduce state revenue by $300 million through the coming year.
 
Lawmakers in at least 15 states in US, including New York and Illinois, have "heeded the call" to end sales tax on such feminine products.


"Each of these bills creates a new tax break or expands an existing tax break," Brown had said in a statement explaining his decision. 

"As I said last year, tax breaks are the same as new spending – they both cost the general fund money."

Lawmakers, however, have rejected his argument, with some suggesting that a wiser approach would be to tax candy, soda and snacks, AFP reported today. 

"If you had to tax something, and it had to be candy or tampons and diapers, which would you choose?," assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez was quoted as saying by the Los Angeles Times.

The movement to do away with the "tampon tax" has been gaining traction in recent years and Canada and Ireland are among nations that have scrapped the tax. Last year, French lawmakers voted  to reduce the tax rate on women's sanitary products from 20 per cent to 5.5 per cent.


(WION with inputs from agencies) 
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