US threats against Pakistan can 'negatively' affect relations: ISPR chief Major General Ghafoor

Pakistan's Director General Inter-Services Public Relations took a dig at the US saying 'allies and partners do not give notices to each other'. Photograph:( Twitter )

WION Web Team Islamabad, Federal Capital Territory, Pakistan Dec 23, 2017, 02.45 AM (IST)

Pakistan's Director General Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) Major General Ghafoor told the Dawn newspaper that constant US threats against Pakistan can "negatively affect" the existing cooperation.

Ghafoor's statement comes after US vice president Mike Pence on a surprise visit to Afghanistan on Friday said President Trump had put Pakistan on notice for providing "safe haven" to the Taliban and other terror organisations in its soil.

"For too long Pakistan has provided safe haven to the Taliban and many terrorist organisations, but those days are over," Pence told American troops at the Bagram airbase in Afghanistan.

However, Ghaffor had a different take on the subject, speaking to Dawn, he said: "Allies and partners do not give notices to each other, neither do they indulge in a blame-game."

On the reported "reimbursement" by US for Pakistan's support on the war on terrorism, the ISPR chief said payments were made under the Coalition Support Fund which was "reimbursement" on the amount Pakistan had already spent on fighting terrorism "under US coordination", adding that Pakistan has been cooperating with the US significantly.

"If they demand us to fight for them because they paid us, Pakistan is not fighting for money," he said, elaborating that,"We are not looking for any money, we are not for sale, a trust-based relationship is the only way forward," the Dawn quoted Ghafoor.

The ISPR chief said Pakistan has been cooperating with the US in Afghanistan although it wasn't easy to win in the region, stating that the war had entered its final phase and the US and its allies including the Afghan forces would have to fight together and win.

Pakistan has been under intense pressure by the US ever since President Trump unveiled his Afghanistan strategy and declared Pakistan was a "safe haven" for terrorists in the region, a  statement which did not go down well with the Pakistan establishment.

Ghafoor told the Dawn newspaper that peace in Afghanistan can be achieved in two ways - Afghan refugees returning to Pakistan and cracking down on narco-trade in the region.

Story highlights

Pakistan has been under intense pressure by the US ever since President Trump unveiled his Afghanistan strategy and declared Pakistan was a "safe haven" for terrorists in the region