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Sushma on Doklam: Both India and China should withdraw troops

Her statement should pave the way for dialogue between Indian national security adviser Ajit Doval and Chinese state councillor Yang Jiechi when they meet at the meeting of NSAs from BRICS countries on July 27 and 28.? Photograph: (Zee News Network)

WION Web Team New Delhi, Delhi, India Jul 21, 2017, 04.47 AM (IST)

Indian foreign minister Sushma Swaraj said in Parliament on Thursday that both India and China should withdraw their troops from their current flashpoint on the Doklam plateau. 

So far, Beijing has been saying India should withdraw its troops from Doklam before dialogue can be held, while India has said the issue should be resolved peacefully through dialogue. 

Sushma's statement, the Indian Express reported, should pave the way for dialogue between Indian national security adviser Ajit Doval and Chinese state councillor Yang Jiechi when they meet at the meeting of NSAs from BRICS countries on July 27 and 28. 

The Express added that sources had said India's demand — articulated by external affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj in Parliament Thursday — has been conveyed to the Chinese side through diplomatic channels.

The Express quoted Swaraj as saying in Parliament, “Agar Chin unilaterally us trijunction point ke status quo ko badal deta hai, toh phir seedhe seedhe hamari suraksha ko chunauti hoti hai… unki maang yeh hai ki hum apni senayein wahan se withdraw kar lein… hum yeh chahate hain ki agar samvaad chal raha hai ki agar baithkar koi baat-cheet karni hai, toh dono apni apni senayein hatayein. Bharat ki taraf se koi bhi unreasonable baat nahin ho rahi hai.”

(“If China unilaterally changes the status quo at the trijunction point, then that is a direct challenge to our security. Their demand is that we should withdraw our troops from there. We want that, if we are having a conversation, if we want to have talks, then both should withdraw their armies. From our side, there is no unreasonable demand.”)

The Doklam plateau lies in Bhutan, but China lays claim to it. 

The current standoff, according to the Indian version, began when China began building a road in the region. 

The Bhutanese Army tried to stop them but their efforts were rebuffed, which is when they asked Indian troops to step in. 

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