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Opinion: Pakistan fuels global terrorism in releasing Hafiz Saeed

Sources in the home department of the Punjab government however are insisting that Saeed will not be released as he is being booked in another case. Photograph: (AFP)

Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India Nov 24, 2017, 12.13 PM (IST) Madhumita Saha

Hafiz Saeed walks free; he vows to fight 'Kashmir cause'. 

India had her fair share of revolutionaries too who gave up their lives, fighting the oppressive colonial rule. 

But Hafiz Saeed is no revolutionary. Even if you empathise with the cause of the Kashmiri people, one cannot condone the brutality of Hafiz's actions. 

While nationalist revolutionaries, through the first half of the twentieth century, targetted notorious police officers and oppressive District Magistrates who served as the pillars of British rule in India, the types of Hafiz Saeed had been indiscriminate in their killings. 

He had been declared a 'global terrorist' by the US following his role in the 2008 Mumbai attack. Sayeed has so far, however, denied his involvement.  

The Kashmir crisis needs a constructive solution, and it will be wrong and foolhardy to give the control of the movement to someone who is not even part of the everyday struggle of a common Kashmiri.
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Yesterday, the Pakistan government has released Saeed from house arrest after he announced a month of solidarity for Kashmiris in January. Saeed's release has provoked a strong reaction from India, who had been demanding his extradition for years now. 

I am not here to pass judgement as to whether supporting the Kashmiri cause is right or not. What I am trying to point out here is that people like Hafeez Sayeed if they want to fight for the 'Kashmir cause', they can't inhabit the safe haven of Pakistan and instigate the Kashmiri youths to violence. 

The Kashmir crisis needs a constructive solution, and it will be wrong and foolhardy to give the control of the movement to someone who is not even part of the everyday struggle of a common Kashmiri. Hafeez coopting the movement would only increase senseless violence which is not going to give us a solution at the end of the day.

The Global Terrorism index states that over the past 15 years, South Asia experienced the most terrorist activity. Globally, attacks against civilians increased by 17 per cent from 2015 to 2016. India has not escaped this deadly trend. The primary targets of terrorists are private citizens and property. 

With 25, 673 deaths in 2016, the number of people dying from terrorism have now fallen by 22 per cent since the peak in 2014.
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Before it is too late, we have to take steps whereby we can control the damaging effects of terrorism engulfing major parts of the world. Though deaths from terrorism have risen in tandem with battle-related deaths, deaths caused by terrorism decreased by 13 per cent from 2015 to 2016.  With 25, 673 deaths in 2016, the number of people dying from terrorism have now fallen by 22 per cent since the peak in 2014. These figures hold some optimism for the future. 

However, while the intensity of terrorism in many countries has decreased, terrorism continues to spread to more countries. The average country score for the GTI, which measures the impact of terrorism, deteriorated by four per cent and reflects this spread of terrorism. There were 77 countries that experienced deaths from terrorism, which is an increase from 65 the previous year. Two-thirds of all countries experienced a terrorist attack in 2016. 

Hafiz Saeed and those similar to who does not seek a political solution to political crisis needs to be contained. Pakistan will do better understand this. In its bid to score a point against India, Pakistan will make a terrible mistake to let miscreants such as Hafiz Saeed go scot free. 

 

 

Madhumita Saha

The writer is an academic-turned journalist. She taught history at Drexel University and New York University before joining WION.

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