Nepal Parliament begins discussion on no-trust motion against Prime Minister Oli

Nepal Parliament begins discussion on no-trust motion against Prime Minister Oli

A total of 281 parliamentarians of 13 parties have supported the motion. The parliament will hold discussions for three days on the motion. Photograph: (AFP)

PTI Kathmandu, Nepal Jul 23, 2016, 12.13 AM (IST)
Nepal Parliament today started a three-day discussion on the no-confidence motion filed against embattled Prime Minister K P Sharma Oli after all the three bills related to the annual budget were rejected by majority vote.

Speaking in the 598-member House, Communist Party of Nepal (CPN) (Maoist Centre) chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal 'Prachanda' sought the support of the lawmakers for the no-confidence motion.

The no-trust motion was registered by the largest party in the parliament Nepali Congress, CPN-Maoist Centre and CPN-United.
They have been demanding that Oli should resign to clear the way for formation of a new government.

A total of 281 parliamentarians of 13 parties have supported the motion. The parliament will hold discussions for three days on the motion.

Earlier in the day, the parliament rejected all three budget-related bills by majority vote.

Nepali Congress and Maoist had decided to table the bills before tabling the no-trust motion as per the request of the ruling parties, but they voted against it.

The parliament meeting has been postponed till tomorrow morning.

Oli, who became prime minister last October heading Nepal's eighth government in the past 10 years, has been facing a no-trust motion after the Maoists withdrew support from the coalition government last week.

Nepali Congress and the Maoists tabled the no-trust motion against Oli, accusing him of not honouring his past commitments.
Oli has refused to step down, despite the fact that the coalition government led by him is in minority after the Maoists withdrew their support to the coalition government.

(PTI)

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

The no-confidence motion was registered by the largest party in the Parliament, the Nepali Congress, seeking support of other lawmakers

  • delete
  • 1/3