India does not want discussion because it wants to use anti-Pak rhetoric in 2019 elections: Pak PM Imran

PM Imran Khan at Kartarpur ceremony Photograph:( Reuters )

WION Web Team Islamabad, Pakistan Dec 03, 2018, 10.03 PM (IST)

Just days after laying the foundation stone for the Kartarpur corridor, PM Imran Khan told a Pakistani TV channel that the Army and PTI was one on the Kartarpur issue.

"The whole country backs the Kartarpur initiative," the Pakistan prime minister said, adding, "we need to move on from the past."

The Pakistan prime minister distanced himself from foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi who reportedly said that PM Imran Khan had bowled a "googly" to ensure Indian government's presence at the Kartarpur corridor.

Imran said he used the Germany-France analogy in India-Pak relations as the two nations had fought wars just as the two European powers earlier.

Shah Mahmood perhaps said the googly comment in some other manner, he asserted while adding, "I believe Kartarpur corridor is an excellent initiative." 

"I saw so much of happiness..the minister cried," he said while describing the Kartarpur event.

"After Kartarpur, it would be very difficult for Indians to do propaganda against Pakistan and perhaps that's what Shah Mahmood meant as well," he said.

"India does not want to sit down for discussion because they want to use the anti-Pak rhetoric in the upcoming 2019 election," he declared during the TV interview.

"I completely believe in a two-nation theory, we are two separate nations," he told the TV channel.

On the question whether all the decisions of the government were always his own, the prime minister said, "There is no decision which is not mine..all are mine and General Bajwa stands right beside those decisions."

On Pakistan-China relations, the Pak PM said that he wanted to replicate the China model which created special export zones. The Pakistan prime minister acknowledged that the country was lagging behind in 'ease of doing business' but asserted that although it was a slow process but his government was trying its best ease of doing business.