World's deadliest cruise missiles

A cruise missile is a guided missile used against terrestrial targets that remains in the atmosphere and flies the major portion of its flight path at approximately constant speed

3M-54 Klub

The Russian 3M-54 is developed by the Novator Design Bureau. It is designed to destroy submarine and surface vessels and also engage static/slow-moving targets, whose coordinates are known in advance, even if these targets are protected by active defences and electronic countermeasures.

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BrahMos

BrahMos Aerospace was formed as a joint venture between Defence Research and Development Organisation of India and Joint Stock Company "Military Industrial Consortium" NPO Mashinostroyenia of Russia.

The missile has flight range of up to 290 km with supersonic speed all through the flight. It has the ability to carry a warhead weighing 200 - 300 kgs

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C-802

The C-802 land attack and anti-ship cruise missile [Western designation SACCADE], is an improved version of the C-801 which employs a small turbojet engine in place of the original solid rocket engine. Its guidance equipment has strong anti-jamming capability, and targets ships that have a very low success rate in intercepting the missile.

It can be launched from airplanes, ships, submarines and land-based vehicles, and is considered along with the US "Harpoon" as among the best anti-ship missiles in the present day.

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P-800 Oniks

The P-800 Oniks is one of the most deadly anti-ship missiles today.
It has an effective guidance system. Its "fire-and-forget" system allows its launch platform to run to safety after launching the missile.

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P-270 Moskit

The P-270 Moskit is a Russian supersonic ramjet-powered cruise missile. The Moskit is one of the missiles known by the NATO codename SS-N-22 Sunburn. It reaches a speed of Mach 3 at high altitude and Mach 2.2 at low-altitude.

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