Was Amelia Earhart captured by the Japanese army in World War II?

The mystery behind the disappearance of famous American pilot Amelia Earhart is now being investigated by the History Channel.

The first female pilot to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

Amelia Mary Earhart disappeared on July 2 1937 as she went out to fulfill her dream of flying across the globe.

The prevailing belief is that Earhart, 39, and Noonan, 44, ran out of fuel and ditched their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in the Pacific Ocean near remote Howland Island while on the third-to-last leg of their epic journey. (AFP)

A file photo released by the US National Archives suggested that Amelia and her co pilot Noonan may have survived their journey during 1937. History channel is soon to air the program ""Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence" in which they'll be enclosing the mystery behind Amelia's disappearance. (AFP)

Earhart became the 16th woman to be issued a pilot's license

The woman pilot along with Fred Noonan set out on a navigation round the world in the year 1937, but were found missing since July 2, 1937. The search for Amelia and Fred went on for about 2 years but they both were declared dead on January 5, 1939. (AFP)

A file photo released by NASA of Amelia Earhart during her tour of Langley in Virginia

This November 1928 file photo released by NASA shows front row (L-R) E.A. Meyers, Elton Miller, Amelia Earhart, Henry Reid, and Lt. Col. Jacob W.S. Wuest. Back row (L-R) Carlton Kemper, Raymond Sharp, Thomas Carroll, (unknown person behind Earhart), and Fred Weick,during her tour of Langley in Virginia.

It is one of the most tantalising mysteries in aviation lore -- the disappearance of Amelia Earhart.

What happened to the legendary American aviatrix and her navigator, Fred Noonan, during their 1937 round-the-world flight has fascinated historians for decades and spawned books, movies and theories galore.But a documentary to be aired on the History Channel on July 9, 2017 -- "Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence" -- claims to have unearthed a beguiling new clue about their fate. (AFP) (AFP)

US National Archives released a suspicious picture showing Amelia Earhart and her fellow aviator on a dock in 1930s

In this photo released by the US National Archives and received by AFP on July 6, 2017, shows a group of people standing on a dock in the 1930's, one that may be Amelia Earhart, on the Jaluit Atoll, Marshall islands.

The prevailing belief is that Earhart, 39, and navigator, Fred Noonan, 44, ran out of fuel and ditched their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in the Pacific Ocean near remote Howland Island while on the third-to-last leg of their epic journey.

The History Channel program suggests, however, that Earhart, who was seeking to become the first woman flier to circumnavigate the globe, and Noonan may have survived and been taken prisoner by Japanese forces.

The evidence cited by History is a blurry black-and-white photograph discovered in the National Archives in Washington which purports to show the pair in the Marshall Islands after their capture. (AFP) (AFP)

A zoomed view of the picture released by US National Archives

The black and white picture is being seen as an evidence to prove that the pilots survived. The History Channel is also airing a program named "Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence" on Sunday. (AFP)