Bhutan: Life, art and nature

The Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan boasts of quietude and a pristine landscape that remain its biggest tourist attractions.

The stately Changlimithang Stadium and Archery Ground of Thimphu was built on the site of a crucial battle in 1885.


The stately Changlimithang Stadium and Archery Ground of Thimphu was built on the site of a crucial battle in 1885, which established the supremacy of Ugyen Wangchuk, the first King of unified Bhutan. (WION)

Changlimithang Stadium is the home to the Bhutan national football team.

Changlimithang Stadium is the home to the Bhutan national football team. (WION)

Paro Airport: This beautiful airport is considered to be one of the most dangerous in the world.


Paro Airport: This beautiful airport is considered to be one of the most dangerous in the world. Only a handful of pilots are qualified to land here. (WION)

Bhutan's Buddha Dordenma statue is one of the largest in the world.


Buddha Dordenma: One of the largest in the world, this 51.5 mt tall Shakyamuni statue sits atop a hill at Kuensel Phodrang Nature Park and overlooks the Thimphu valley. (WION)

Paro Taktsang: This picturesque monastery was first built in 1692 on a cliff where Guru Padmasambhava arrived riding a tigress’s back.

Paro Taktsang: This picturesque monastery was first built in 1692 on a cliff where Guru Padmasambhava (aka Guru Rinpoche) arrived riding a tigress’s back. Rinpoche is said to have brought Buddhism to Bhutan in the 8th century. (WION)

The Bhutanese parliament, Gyelyong Tshokhang, is made up of King of Bhutan, the National Council and the National Assembly.


Picturesque Parliament: The Bhutanese parliament, Gyelyong Tshokhang, is made up of King of Bhutan, the National Council and the National Assembly, the upper and lower houses respectively. (WION)

Paddy and Paro: Rice is part of the staple diet of Bhutan’s people.


Paddy and Paro: Rice is part of the staple diet of Bhutan’s people. (WION)

How Green is My Valley: A view of Thimphu valley from Buddha Dordenma.


How Green is My Valley: A view of Thimphu valley from Buddha Dordenma. (WION)

The W Factor: As per Bhutan’s latest Gross National Happiness survey, the women may not be as happy as men.

The W Factor: As per Bhutan’s latest Gross National Happiness survey, the women may not be as happy as men. However, they fare much better than Bangladesh, India and Pakistan on Gender Inequality Index. (WION)

Rinpung Dzong: This seventeenth century dzong is the home to the district Monastic Body and Paro Dzongkhag’s administrative offices.

Rinpung Dzong: This seventeenth century dzong (monastery cum fortress) is the home to the district Monastic Body and Paro Dzongkhag’s administrative offices. (WION)

Cheesy Matters: Bhutanese cuisine relies heavily upon cheese.


Cheesy Matters: Bhutanese cuisine relies heavily upon cheese. Ema Datsi, the national dish, is a sinful preparation of cheese and peppers.
(WION)

Make Some Noise: Bhutan may be quiet but it is not boring.

Make Some Noise: Bhutan may be quiet but it is not boring. Every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, places like Mojo Park enthral native and foreigner patrons alike with live music performances. (WION)

Thumping in Thimpu: The capital city boasts of electrifying yet safe nightlife on weekends.


Thumping in Thimpu: The capital city boasts of electrifying yet safe nightlife on weekends. (WION)

India Effect: From the armed forces to street food, India remains a welcome influence in the lives of Bhutanese people.



India Effect: From the armed forces to street food, India remains a welcome influence in the lives of Bhutanese people. Do expect cheese in your tikki, though!
(WION)